Thai infrastructure

Re: Thai infrastructure

Postby Eric on Wed Aug 25, 2010 4:59 pm

Micheal Bukit, a well written posting. Just a correction on your post about the British returning Singapore back to Malaysia. Singapore was not a part of Malaya (not Malaysia) then. Singapore negotiated with Malaya together with Sabah and Sarawak to form Malaysia as Singapore had no source of revenue. Malaysia was coined by adding Malaya to Singapore. That Singapore has to break away had lots to do with the growing influence of the PAP which is mostly Chinese in Malay dominated Malaysia. However you also is right to said that some demands from Singapore were just too much for Tungku Adul Rahman to accept. Also, I though a mentioned of names of the visonary & capable individuals who brought Singapore to its current success story is appropriate. Lee (PM) and Goh (economic architect) must be credited with Singapore success. :cheers:
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Re: Thai infrastructure

Postby Voice on Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:16 am

Hi Michael Yes you are right about having a good leader like Singapore. And it a good thing that good leader do listening to other and took their advice into consideration and choose the right direction that would be benefit millions of people which it isn’t easy when we have to deal with large numbers of people. The problem with Thailand is that it doesn’t matter how good it sound and proven advice due to their personal greed everything will stop at the first sentence. To keep high standard means that they cannot fix their book without anyone noticing it. So they prefer to have no standard at all so it would take time for anyone to notice any different. It doesn’t matter how honest you wants to be someone will be reminding you that you haven’t got on the same colour underpants as they do. It’s not that they like or love their brotherhood but they prefer to remind you that they are your beloved brother. Ahbisit may have good intention about the future of Thailand but he isn’t strong enough for them. So he has to go with the flows .
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Re: Thai infrastructure

Postby drake on Sat Oct 09, 2010 10:06 am

prommee_NE wrote:Talking of Solar Panels....I was chatting to a manufacturer of them (from raw materials) about five years ago on a hospital balcony in Udon Thani. He had moved his company from China to Khon Kaen because the workforce was much better in Thailand (not because it was cheaper!)...and was manufacturing very good solar panels...but only for export. The internal market was using an inferior quality panel manufactured somewhere else closer to BKK. (maybe he would say that but look it up and you will see the differences)

The point I would like to make however, is that electricity as it is currently created in Thailand is so much cheaper than solar energy that solar has no chance of entering the main market on the same scale as (say) Germany. There are however other energy alternatives that are better suited to the physical and climatic conditions in Thailand. Biomass is one such resource that has been experimented with on a small scale...but could be used in many villages and make them more self-sufficient...especially if the machinery included the production of compost. There are machines that have been designed in Denmark and possibly elsewhere that are ideal for village use...that are much cheaper than the solar panels provided as Government grants to places without electricity (or were provided in a former pre-coup era)...they rely on ready available current waste products with the addition of a small area of easily grown fuel. It would of course remove a source of income from the Electricity Providers...but would help the village communities and Thailand in general tremendously.


Regarding PV/Solar Electric.
The basic technology to manufacture the solar cell is the same as for other semiconductor devices but simpler.
IF someone were to start up a fab (semiconductor foundry) then it can be a stepping stone to more complex product(s).
As far as I know, there is no semiconductor foundry of any kind in Thailand (someone correct me, please)
By any chance you recall the name of this Chinese company in KhonKaen ?

Whereas the cost of electricity is a little cheaper in Thailand than in Europe/US, there is a huge amount of government subsidy in PV and non-fossil fuel based energy and hence the popularity there. Where many electricity generating entities in Europe and US are 'for profit' private corporation,in Thiland, EGAT would be very happy to lose a few customers because they are quite overloaded the way it is.
My real interest on the topic isn't about electric power generation but rather getting Thailand it's own semiconductor manufacturing capability and PV cell foundry is a good stepping stone.

Biomass, that's a different animal.
Depending on what it is, one either burn it directly in a high temperature furnace or convert it in to some other fuel (eg. methanol, ethanol, methane, bio-diesel) Except for bio-diesel, the process is a little more complicated/tedious and not that suitable for deployment in small ville. There is no single ideal solution for localized renewable electric generation, every location is unique and the solution must be optimized for each location.
:cheers:
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Re: Thai infrastructure

Postby Christian9 on Wed Nov 06, 2013 12:28 pm

drake wrote:
prommee_NE wrote:Talking of solar panel....I was chatting to a manufacturer of them (from raw materials) about five years ago on a hospital balcony in Udon Thani. He had moved his company from China to Khon Kaen because the workforce was much better in Thailand (not because it was cheaper!)...and was manufacturing very good solar panels...but only for export. The internal market was using an inferior quality panel manufactured somewhere else closer to BKK. (maybe he would say that but look it up and you will see the differences)

The point I would like to make however, is that electricity as it is currently created in Thailand is so much cheaper than solar energy that solar has no chance of entering the main market on the same scale as (say) Germany. There are however other energy alternatives that are better suited to the physical and climatic conditions in Thailand. Biomass is one such resource that has been experimented with on a small scale...but could be used in many villages and make them more self-sufficient...especially if the machinery included the production of compost. There are machines that have been designed in Denmark and possibly elsewhere that are ideal for village use...that are much cheaper than the solar panels provided as Government grants to places without electricity (or were provided in a former pre-coup era)...they rely on ready available current waste products with the addition of a small area of easily grown fuel. It would of course remove a source of income from the Electricity Providers...but would help the village communities and Thailand in general tremendously.


Regarding PV/Solar Electric.
The basic technology to manufacture the solar cell is the same as for other semiconductor devices but simpler.
IF someone were to start up a fab (semiconductor foundry) then it can be a stepping stone to more complex product(s).
As far as I know, there is no semiconductor foundry of any kind in Thailand (someone correct me, please)
By any chance you recall the name of this Chinese company in KhonKaen ?

Whereas the cost of electricity is a little cheaper in Thailand than in Europe/US, there is a huge amount of government subsidy in PV and non-fossil fuel based energy and hence the popularity there. Where many electricity generating entities in Europe and US are 'for profit' private corporation,in Thiland, EGAT would be very happy to lose a few customers because they are quite overloaded the way it is.
My real interest on the topic isn't about electric power generation but rather getting Thailand it's own semiconductor manufacturing capability and PV cell foundry is a good stepping stone.

Biomass, that's a different animal.
Depending on what it is, one either burn it directly in a high temperature furnace or convert it in to some other fuel (eg. methanol, ethanol, methane, bio-diesel) Except for bio-diesel, the process is a little more complicated/tedious and not that suitable for deployment in small ville. There is no single ideal solution for localized renewable electric generation, every location is unique and the solution must be optimized for each location.
:cheers:


Yes there is no other way of generating clean and renewable electricity.. I have got solar panels for my home roof and got good some results.
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Re: Thai infrastructure

Postby banmebkk on Mon Nov 11, 2013 3:55 pm

On the note of semi-conductor factory. Thailand simply has no local hi-tech company that has the ability, research, and skills to start up a semi-conductor factory. Not only that a hi tech semi-conductor factory will cost more than $1 billion to build, most of these companies have the support of the government. You can read about Taiwan Semiconductor Factory online.

The only way Thailand might have one will be due to foreign investment from either a Taiwanese or Korean company. In order to be able to support such a facility, the management personnel will need a high level of education. Sadly Thailand only has a handful of talent that can manage this type of factory, not to mention the workers. This is why those factories are still in Taiwan, South Korea, China, and other first world countries (yes, China is not first world but its go the skills and brains). Companies in this field don't necessary benefit from the low wages that Thailand has to offer, skills and education comes first.
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