Living in an Isarn Village

Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Juan on Tue Jan 01, 2008 8:25 pm

I have been several times visiting my girlfriend’s village in Isarn, near Mukdahan.

First time I was there I felt in love with the place and immediately wanted to build a house and spend part of my time living there. The place appeared to me so nice and authentic, the rice fields, the vegetation, the nice friendly people, the peace and quiet, the nature in all its glory, etcetera. Just perfect!

As I continued visiting the place I started having second thoughts. The problem is that after a few days I get bored, there isn’t much to do and the picture is not so bucolic any more. I was glad I didn’t rush things. Thanks God, for once sensible!!

I know some of you actually live in the countryside. I suppose it must be a matter of adjusting yourself to a different pace and getting organized. I just wonder how it is and how you get by living in a small Isarn village.

I wish you the very best for this New Year. No hard feelings, I love you all.

Juan
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RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby colin howard on Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:23 am

hi juan , theres a lot of sense in what you write , i think that you really need other farangs in the area so you can enjoy a night out with the boys and have conversation with someone you have more in common with , you also need a hobby , i go fishing , make my own wine , go out on my mountain bike EVERY DAY and on average do 25 kliks , also i have my PC and UBC TV , all in all i am anything but bored , life is what you make it pure and simple , the big mistake many farangs make is that they marry the whole family and allow themselves to be treated like a walking ATM machine and complain how they have been conned , sorry its there fault and theres alone , in no way would i blame someone else for my own shortcomings which seems to be the cop out for most farangs , colin .
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby robin on Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:28 pm

Colin,
I think one of the big problems is not having a plan. Many of my friends retired to golf or travel. But, that soon ran its course then they were stuck with a lot of idle time.
Like Juan said in the beginning...
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Juan on Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:46 am

Hi Colin,

Your post is worth its weight on gold. It seems to me that you got it right; frankly I admire you for that.

I guess you represent the happy side of the issue; probably many others can’t say the same. I heard a lot of sad stories. Men being scam and left heartbroken and penniless (I’m afraid we will not hear much from those). Fortunately in Thailand you wouldn’t be heart broken for too long, but if you lose your assets then you most certainly will be ``out off business``.

The future is very uncertain and we all know how risky it is to make long time arrangements but if things goes right (hopefully) with my dear lady; within a few years I will seriously consider building a house and moving to live there for reasonable periods of time, then I will most certainly try to follow your steps, honest!

Juan
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby colin howard on Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:15 am

hi juan , before i bought my house i rented one for 5 months , to lay out big money just at the whim of your intended is foolhardy to the extreme , before i bought mine i was 110% sure our partnership was on level ground , why be rushed into anything ? , if your relationship's strong enough it will stand the test of time for a few months , the problem is as i have written so many times before is that many farangs rush headlong into the unknown and then regret there haste at there leisure, of course it is always someone else,s fault , in any partnership there has to be an element of trust , but i trust my own judgement above anything else , and in the 4 years i,ve lived in thailand its never let me down , regards , colin .
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Juan on Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:22 am

Hi Robin,

Just imagine how much idle time we’ll have when we die!!

In my humble opinion life has to be grasp and do the most of it (especially when we achieve a certain age) Failing to do so because of shyness, apprehension or simply because we worry about other’s opinion seems to me utter foolishness.

In my book getting bored it is a serious sin. There is so much to do in life, so many interesting things! Just look at this forum, I find it fascinating being able to communicate with people like you and so many others. Where on earth I would find a pal who gives me a damn good advice about Thailand!!

Nothing more pathetic that somebody who is bored and don’t find things to do!!

Best regards
Juan
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Juan on Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:31 am

Hi Colin,

Renting out a house for several months before engaging in building seems to me a sound thing to do. It lets you have a feel of the place before you lay out the pennies.

Regards
Juan
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Rooster on Sat Jan 05, 2008 11:31 pm

Juan, you are not the first urban cowboy who mesmerized when they are first explore to real natural settings. Rural livings are the same everywhere whether it is in Thailand or in EU and North America. You have to have the real cowboy spirit to make it along with the efficient economic practices. If you are young and restless, you can not live in the rural and serene settings. Rural people living their lives according to seasons and having their fun activities with religious and cultural ceremonies.
If you are truely wished to live in the countryside, you need to find a place to practice living in the farm in your own country first. Than save enough money and get education with skill before you want to return with your Thai girl to live in her rurual village. You can build a simple two bedrooms house for about $5,000 USD with mosquitoe screens on her family's land. You can combine the European farming practices with Thai farming practices to find the best practices for your situation, have a pot of vegetable garden and flower pots in front of the house, keep chickens for eggs, have small pond for fishes beside the ponds in the paddy field, and etc. You will be surprise and to tire to find extra time for clubing and chasing women. When the children are coming along, you will have your handful in keeping up with them and teaching them skills as you have learned yourself.
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby Ian on Sun Jan 06, 2008 9:35 pm

Juan - Colin is lucky, and unusual, in that he has n't been threatened by a gun.
You have to be very aware that in marrying an Isaarn woman you there's a high risk her family - or friends working for them - will force you out of the house you have paid for, at the point of a gun.
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RE: RE: Living in an Isarn Village

Postby colin howard on Mon Jan 07, 2008 11:03 am

hi ian , i think it depends on the women , my lady informs me that her family NEVER did anything for her and her loyalty's are with me and me alone , in other words in every situation i come first and her family is a very distant second , regards , colin .
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