Nuclear Power for Thailand

Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby Paul Garrioch on Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:40 am

The Prime Minister has explained the plan for a nuclear power plant to produce energy for Thailand and help Thailand move away from reliance on oil and gas. Thailand is a net importer of energy, getting much of its energy from the middle east at a huge cost to the country. Added to that the use of oil is polluting and a cause of green house gases.

So the plan is to import huge numbers of foreign experts into Thailand and spend lots of money to build a nuclear power plant which would be operational by about 2020. Thailand would then need to continue hiring foreigners to run the plant, perhaps continue paying off the foreign debt they will get by building the plant and will be in constant need of foreign uranium and foreign help to get rid of or store the incredibly toxic waste produce that comes from nuclear energy.

It seems to my simple brain that this does not fix Thailand's energy problems. Nuclear energy relies on foreign materials (uranium) which Australia almost has a monopoly on and so can set the price however they want (ie. wait 10-20 years until everyone relies on uranium and then double the price). Nuclear energy is just as polluting or more so than oil, especially if you count the mass usage of oil and coal used in the mining of uranium. Then there is the massive problem of storing incredibly toxic waste for thousands of years. Added to that - in a world political situation that is becoming more unstable and a world environment that is becoming more unstable - why would we want a nuclear power plant anywhere near us?

Hmmm, what can we do to stop this silly idea???? Clearly the better answers are:
Use less energy.
Use energy more efficiently
Use renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, thermal, tidal, etc.
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RE: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby Axel Hagemann on Sat Nov 17, 2007 8:35 pm

Nuclear is certainly not the solution, but is part of. Of course Thailand would rely on foreign fuel supply. What is neglected also in my country is the energy density of nuclear. Refueling cycles of 1 year!!! Compare this to coal or oil and you will see dependency is very much different.
Of course saving energy is another important part of solution. We have heating now from 2 C to 22 C, Thailand is nice warm, but more and more Thai cool it down from 32 to 20 - and it is all electric power produced by burning: heat to cool. It is more than 3 times wasting compared to heating!
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RE: RE: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby Danuj Kamolvathin on Tue Nov 20, 2007 7:43 am

It is my view that Thailand as a nation must develop more efficient fuel sources to counter act the dependencies on fossil fuels, however, to consider nuclear energy as an alternative at this point simply is not prudent.

I believe that nuclear energy in today’s global economy is based on the premise of tiers of effective energy management. Thailand should take this opportunity to develop programs that exhibit successful energy strategies in stages with comprehensive benchmarks to lay a framework for future more advanced forms of energy.
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Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby Leum Laaou on Fri Nov 23, 2007 10:49 am

Thailand is power hungry. Look around you, everything is sucking it up.

Just as well Laos is so pliable and poor eh?

Here's a little bit about what Thailand is doing to satisfy its energy demands:

http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/15/news/rcorpdam.php
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RE: RE: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby axel hagemann on Thu Dec 20, 2007 1:02 am

when I came first time to Thailand, again I had this air conditioning exoerience like in US! But I was not in US,k I was in cooled paradise. How much energy consumes an AC? AND: for what? Just to froze you in taxi?
it is so frustrating to see humans discussing about energy!
Again nuclear helps, but does not solve for the long term!
hag
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RE: RE: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby Rooster on Fri Feb 01, 2008 10:32 am

Nuclear countdown

By Yuthana Praiwan
On his very last day as energy minister, Piyasvasti Amranand officially inaugurated a three-year, 1.38- billion-baht study of nuclear power generation for Thailand.

The study would be undertaken by the new Nuclear Power Development Office (NPDO). The working panel would be chaired by Norkhun Sitthiphong, the current deputy permanent secretary for the Energy Ministry.Dr Piyasvasti said the preparation procedure involved various elements including a feasibility study, site selection, public acceptance plan, and development of the required technical skills for local personnel.


As well, he said, amendments to national laws were needed to expand the permitted usage of nuclear beyond food, medical and military research applications. Thailand has had a small research reactor for more than 40 years.


The legislation would also cover safety standards to comply with the International Atomic Energy Agency.


The cost of the study would be borne by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) and the Energy Conservation Fund, with nuclear specialists from various public agencies involved.


Dr Piyasvasti has been an outspoken supporter of building nuclear power plants, citing the country's high reliance on costly fossil fuels, limited availability of renewable energy, and global climate-change concerns.


The government is now looking for a public-relations agency to carry out a public education plan to promote understanding of nuclear power.


Most renewable energy has much higher production costs compared to nuclear power, which costs about two baht a kilowatt/hour (unit) to generate, compared with 5.5 baht a unit for wind power, 10.5 baht for solar, and 4.50 baht for biogas. Dr Piyasvasti said the study group was prepared to abandon its work if studies showed that other fuels would be cheaper than nuclear.


One approach with high potential is believed to be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), a new technology that turns coal into gas, but it could take two decades to develop on a commercial scale.


Dr Piyasvasti's term as energy minister has also been marked by vigorous promotion of alternative fuels through a power demand-side management programme, providing soft loans and subsidies for energy-saving systems.
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Re: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby apee705 on Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:35 pm

It is irony of the world economic & political order that some powerful countries try to confine modern tech & scientific implication within its wall & atomic energy is one of them, there is a dualism in western policy makers attitude regarding it. Every country should be freed to use atomic power for constructive purpose & to combat energy crisis. :geek:
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Re: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby ipsut on Thu May 13, 2010 1:51 am

apee705 wrote: Every country should be freed to use atomic power for constructive purpose & to combat energy crisis. :geek:


I agree, however it seems to me that when the abundance of sunshine in Thailand is considered, solar power would be preferable here. Like the mess the United States is dealing with at present in the gulf of Mexico with the oil spill. I regard nuclear energy in the same vein, as leaks are inevitable, and when they happen either today or 30 years from now, are catastrophic.
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Re: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby drake on Fri Jul 16, 2010 11:43 pm

ipsut wrote: Like the mess the United States is dealing with at present in the gulf of Mexico with the oil spill. I regard nuclear energy in the same vein, as leaks are inevitable, and when they happen either today or 30 years from now, are catastrophic.


I'm sorry but you are just parrotting talking points from anti-nukes kooks - which is not based on facts or stats.

Leaks are NOT inevitable.
While we have had a couple of major nuclear FUBAR since the beginning of nuke programs 70 odd years ago,
the rest of the nuclear programs world wide had NO incident.
That is safety rating of 99.9% or better.
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Re: Nuclear Power for Thailand

Postby ipsut on Sat Jul 24, 2010 12:04 am

drake wrote:
ipsut wrote:
I'm sorry but you are just parroting talking points from anti-nukes kooks - which is not based on facts or stats.


I would not want anyone to believe what I say without checking for themselves. So for any that are interested, just google Nuclear Leaks, you will likely learn that I have not parroted words for anti-nukes kooks. You will see that leaks happen frequently, and as human beings are involved will continue to happen, large leaks happen rarely, but when they do they are more than just an inconvenience. Also when a government finds itself short of money as all governments to from time to time, the over sight of industry becomes painfully weak. The parroting from the nuclear industry as the oil industry promoters would have us believe mistakes just don't happen with todays technology. Which is just not true.
Last edited by ipsut on Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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