TV leads among Thai viewers

TV leads among Thai viewers

About half of the population is still likely to watch live TV programmes through traditional TV sets over the next decade, according to a survey by the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission. (Bangkok Post photo)
About half of the population is still likely to watch live TV programmes through traditional TV sets over the next decade, according to a survey by the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission. (Bangkok Post photo)

About half of the population is still likely to watch live TV programmes through traditional TV sets over the next decade, particularly the elderly, according to a survey by the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC).

This is because of a decrease in the birth rate and a rise in average life expectancy, meaning the traditional method of watching TV programmes will persist for some time.

Print media is the least popular genre for consumers. Only 33.7% of survey respondents read, which underscores critical digital disruption in the sector, according to the survey on behaviour and consumption trends for Thai media.

The survey, which was commissioned in collaboration with Thammasat University, gauged people's opinions from 10,000 households nationwide in five regions covering 26 provinces.

The survey was completed based on the criteria from the National Statistical Office, said NBTC vice-chairman Natee Sukonrat.

Motion pictures are the most popular media for consumers, cited by 85.9% of the respondents, followed by billboard advertisements, seen by 84.3%, the survey found.

Audio and movies in cinemas are listened to and watched by 55.6% and 51.5% of the respondents, respectively.

The survey also showed five key findings among media consumers in Thailand.

First, consumer behaviour for media consumption varies by age. Senior citizens, aged 57 or above (baby boomers), still enjoy watching traditional media, including watching live TV programmes on TV sets in line with programming schedules and reading newspapers.

Those aged 41 or lower, or Gen Y and Z, are likely to consume content through a variety of media channels, particularly online media.

Gen X, aged 42-56, are likely to a combination of behaviours from the first two groups.

Second, most people do not have programmes in minds to consume in regard to all types of media, which reflects the decline of consumer loyalty to programmes.

Third, income and education have an impact on content consumption behaviours.

Revenue plays a part in allowing people to have access to content via fixed-broadband service in residences.

High-income households tend to trust ads from online media more than TV media.

Fourth, newspapers have been the most disrupted by digital developments, with consumers turning to read online content instead of papers, particularly Gen Y and Z.

The majority of the young consume content online while the elderly opt for traditional channels.

The elderly population continues to depend on receiving content through traditional media channels.


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