World food prices hit new 10-year high in October, says FAO

World food prices hit new 10-year high in October, says FAO

A farmer harvests wheat crop in Wei county of Handan, Hebei province, China on June 11, 2021. (Reuters photo)
A farmer harvests wheat crop in Wei county of Handan, Hebei province, China on June 11, 2021. (Reuters photo)

PARIS: World food prices rose for a third straight month in October to reach a fresh 10-year peak, led again by increases in cereals and vegetable oils, the UN food agency said on Thursday.

The Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) food price index, which tracks international prices of the most globally traded food commodities, averaged 133.2 points last month compared with a revised 129.2 for September.

The September figure was previously given as 130.

The October reading was the highest for the index since July 2011. On a year-on-year basis, the index was up 31.3%.

Agricultural commodity prices have risen steeply in the past year, driven by harvest setbacks and strong demand.

The FAO's cereal price index rose by 3.2% in October from the previous month.

That was led by a 5% jump in wheat prices, which climbed for a fifth consecutive month to reach their highest since November 2012, the agency said.

"Tighter availability in global markets due to reduced harvests in major exporters, especially Canada, the Russian Federation and the United States of America, continued to put upward pressure on prices," FAO said of wheat.

Wheat futures started November at new peaks, with US prices at fresh highs since 2012 and Paris front-month futures at a record high as import demand remained brisk.

World vegetable oil prices jumped 9.6% on the month to set a record high, supported by further strength in palm oil prices as labour shortages in Malaysia continued to hamper production, FAO said.

In contrast, global sugar prices eased 1.8% in October, ending a run of six straight monthly rises, according to the agency.

Rome-based FAO cut its projection of global cereal production in 2021, to 2.793 billion tonnes from 2.800 billion estimated a month ago, according to its cereal supply and demand outlook.

That mainly reflected reduced wheat output estimates for Iran, Turkey and the United States, offsetting an increased forecast for coarse grain production.

Expected world cereal output would still represent a record, but would trail projected demand, leading to a fall in forecast cereal stocks, FAO said.

Demand was supported by a raised projection of global cereal trade to a new record, bolstered by increased wheat trade.

Do you like the content of this article?
COMMENT (14)

7,139 new Covid cases, 13 more deaths

The country registered 13 more Covid-19 fatalities and 7,139 new cases during the previous 24 hours, the Public Health Ministry announced on Monday morning.

07:46

Taking retail to the next level

During the pandemic the past couple of years, retailers, brands and manufacturers have adapted to changing consumer behaviour.

06:30

FTI club launches EV component plan

The Federation of Thai Industries' (FTI) auto parts club is working to help 2,500 auto parts manufacturers accustomed to producing parts for internal combustion engines (ICE) to shift towards electric vehicle (EV) technology by launching an EV component development plan.

06:22