Time & Tales | Bangkok Post: Lifestyle

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Time & Tales

Address:102/1, Nakornchaisri Rd., Thanon Nakhon Chai Si, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 Thailand

Tel:+6622417400

Service day:Everyday, Service hours: 11:00-23:00

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Official description

Vises Kaiyang's culinary legacy dates back to 1954 and it has long been a well-treasured establishment in its Bang Sue neighbourhood and across Bangkok.

Over the past 63 years, the restaurant that specialises in gai yang or grilled chicken has served up a wide variety of homestyle Thai-Chinese dishes while staying true to original recipes.

Rating

Editorial Reviews

Blast from the past

Though offering an upscale dining experience, Time & Tales still retains it's decades-old recipes

Stir-fried crispy catfish with chillies, green peppercorns and basil.

 

Vises Kaiyang's culinary legacy dates back to 1954 and it has long been a well-treasured establishment in its Bang Sue neighbourhood and across Bangkok.

Over the past 63 years, the restaurant that specialises in gai yang or grilled chicken has served up a wide variety of homestyle Thai-Chinese dishes while staying true to original recipes.

However, though remaining humble and low-key as always, the brand has recently enjoyed a new gourmet venture.

Time & Tales is a spin-off of Vises Kaiyang. Located in a spacious riverside spot next to Phayap Pier on Nakhon Chai Si Road, the two-month-old branch is more spacious and offers an upscale dining experience compared to the original eatery.

Blessed with a lengthy waterfront façade, Time & Tales is decked out in a contemporary warehouse style boasting both an air-conditioned section, as well as al fresco dining veranda.

However, when it comes to the selection on the menu, it seems to have shrunk. Even so, it still lists more than 100 Thai, Chinese and Isan dishes.

The two-month-old eatery is a spin-off of the legendary Vises Kaiyang restaurant.

As the restaurant's name suggests, you couldn't afford to miss its time-honoured grilled chicken (240 baht for a whole chicken). The poultry, from an organic free range local farm, is marinated with a generous and secretive concoction of herbs and spices before being flame-grilled. It yields an aromatic and flavoursome meat underneath thin crispy skin.

To enhance the scrumptious gai yang was som tam (green papaya salad). We went for som tam kai khem (120 baht). The salad's conventional sweet, sour and spicy zest was enhanced with the briny punch from the salted egg.

Enjoying the two above mentioned dishes without a helping of sticky rice is like having a burger minus the bun. And, let me tell you, the sticky rice (25 baht per portion) is a star by itself. The restaurant opts to use only exclusively formulated turmeric-infused glutenous rice, which exhibits a nice yellow hue and firm but soft texture.

The next dish was described in Thai as hao dong, a culinary title basically referring to a jungle-cuisine dish prepared with wild cobra meat.

The two-month-old eatery is a spin-off of the legendary Vises Kaiyang restaurant.

I had expected that the dish (280 baht), which is also one of the restaurant's best-sellers, would be made with a protein other than a snake, retaining the hao dong's characteristic peppery and heat-filled flavour profile. Yet, what appeared was a typical plate of larb nuea (spicy salad of herbs and sliced beef), which, although lacked the spirit of the jungle cuisine, was enjoyable and complemented the som tam and gai yang.

Should you like entrées to go with steamed rice, I would recommend pla duk foo phad phrik khing (200 baht), pla duk phad phed (200 baht) and phad chub chai (250 baht).

The first presents crumbled morsels of fluffy, deep-fried catfish wok-tossed with a sweet red curry paste and chopped string beans. This was addictive and intermingled superbly with rice.

The second dish also features catfish, but the freshwater produce came in crispy sizeable fillets and was wok-fried with chillies, young peppercorns and basil leaves to offer a more fiery punch.

The third, featuring Chinese-style stir-fried vegetables with glass noodles, pork, preserved squid and shrimp, represents the Chinese cuisine, which the restaurant is famous for. Enjoyed with or without rice, the dish is a palate contentment.

Chinese-styled stir-fried vegetables with glass noodles, pork, preserved squid and shrimp.

A few of my dining companions seemed highly satisfied by the restaurant's rendition of taohu phad phrik kluea or deep-fried tofu with garlic and chillies (200 baht). I, however, found nothing extraordinaire in the dish that featured bean curd cubes deep-fried until completely puffed up and almost airy in texture. The tofu was enhanced in taste by a salty, sweet and lightly peppery helping of deep-fried chopped garlic and chillies.

The restaurant has a 250-seat capacity, including two private rooms. Service was fair.

The restaurant's rendition of hao dong with beef as a substituted choice of meat.

Puffed up tofu with chillies and garlic.

Location

102/1, Nakornchaisri Rd., Thanon Nakhon Chai Si, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 Thailand

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