Columnnist

Kanin Srimaneekulroj

Reporter

Kanin Srimaneekulroj
26 Feb 2018

A nation of ever elusive justice

Earlier this week, a video clip was circulated heavily on social media showing a middle-aged woman going to town on a white pickup truck with a hatchet. As it turns out, the truck was parked -- handbrakes and all -- in front of her home, blocking the one point of entry and exit she had, while the owner shopped at one of the many markets surrounding her home. Comments on social media initially criticised the woman for what seemed like extreme overreaction.

26 Feb 2018 1
27 Nov 2017

Prioritising human rights

What exactly is a human right? The most obvious way to answer that question may be to point toward the 30 Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Signed in 1948 and ratified by 48 out of 58 member countries of the UN at the time, the declaration affirms several rights an individual must be afforded as a human being, such as the right to life, opinions and expression, or the right to not be subjected to arbitrary imprisonment or torture.

27 Nov 2017
28 Aug 2017

Learning from history

I recently watched Netflix's Death Note adaptation, officially released last Friday on the streaming site. Based on a famous Japanese manga series, the film revolves around a young man's twisted crusade for justice after having received a special notebook -- the titular death note -- that has the power to kill anyone whose name has been written in it, provided the writer knows their face. Fed up with the many injustices in the world, the young man -- named Light -- uses the note to kill bullies, criminals and even corrupt officials from around the world under the alter-ego Kira, earning a cult-like following from those who agree with his extreme brand of justice.

28 Aug 2017
12 Jun 2017

Where life and reality TV meet

Over the past weeks, two young women from Thailand made international news for wildly different reasons: one was Ariya Jutanugarn, a female golf player who was recently recognised as the world's No.2, the other Preeyanuch "Preaw" Nonwangchai, an attractive karaoke girl who allegedly murdered and dismembered another woman earlier this month.

12 Jun 2017
6 Mar 2017

The cost of muzzling the media

The new media reform bill disturbs me. Drawing much controversy when it was first publicly announced late in January, the bill was immediately opposed by 30 media organisations, who viewed it as an attempt by the government to exert control over the press.

6 Mar 2017
21 Nov 2016

Thugs in high places

It's official: Donald Trump -- real-estate tycoon and producer of the American reality TV show The Apprentice -- will become the 45th president of the United States. Even over a week after the election results were announced, America is still in turmoil, with protests (and in some cases even riots) by people who disapprove of Trump and his disturbing campaign rhetoric breaking out all across the country. Along with news of these protests comes alarming reports of a spiked increase in racist and discriminatory crimes being committed, as Trump supporters of varying ages and genders come out to express their pent-up bigotry.

21 Nov 2016 2
2 May 2016

Cyber bills rapped

Instead of promoting digital economy, the bills are perceived by experts as a monitoring tool that would curb cyber-freedom.

2 May 2016 2
Cyber bills rapped
27 Jan 2016

Classroom respect works both ways

The recent incident concerning the director of Debsirin School getting on his knees to apologise to a disgruntled high school student no doubt made a lot of Thai people uncomfortable. The incident happened when director Ananth Supwaree was called out by a student for having spoken five minutes longer than the 20 minutes he said he required during the school's routine morning flag-raising assembly, a common custom in Thai schools everywhere. The director admitted his mistake to the student, and even offered a wai in the way of an apology.

27 Jan 2016
4 Dec 2015

A spiritual wasteland

Recently, a friend of mine visited a temple to pay respects to his long-departed mother. As is the tradition with these yearly visits, he and his father sat down for lunch with a group of monks to discuss current events and religious teachings. The last thing he expected was to be talking about how Thai Buddhism is under siege by the fast-growing Muslim population, and how steps need to be taken to contain them.

4 Dec 2015 1