8 photo

Brahmin New Year in Bangkok ( 8 photo)

The ancient 10-day rite of Triyumpawai marks the Brahmin New Year, a time for devotees to worship Shiva who, according to Hindu myth, comes down to earth during the period. Triyumpawai is celebrated annually on the half moon night of the second month in the lunar calendar at the Devastan shrine near the Giant Swing in Phra Nakhon district. Photos by Panumas Sanguanwong.

11 Feb 2013
The Devastan, or Hindu shrine, on Din So road in Phra Nakhon district of Bangkok.

The Devastan, or Hindu shrine, on Din So road in Phra Nakhon district of Bangkok.

Phra Maha Raja Guru Bidhi Sri Visudhigun, the chief Brahmin at the Devastan.

Phra Maha Raja Guru Bidhi Sri Visudhigun, the chief Brahmin at the Devastan.

A worshipper attends prayers on the first night of Triyumpawai.

A worshipper attends prayers on the first night of Triyumpawai.

The chief Brahmin invites Earth Goddess Kangka, or Ganges Goddess, and the Sun and Moon gods, to earth to welcome Shiva during the Triyumpawai ritual.

The chief Brahmin invites Earth Goddess Kangka, or Ganges Goddess, and the Sun and Moon gods, to earth to welcome Shiva during the Triyumpawai ritual.

These three wood carvings, or kradan, bearing the images of four deities, are the work of artisans from the early Rattanakosin era.

These three wood carvings, or kradan, bearing the images of four deities, are the work of artisans from the early Rattanakosin era.

A ritual to bid farewell to Shiva.

A ritual to bid farewell to Shiva.

Children with traditional hairstyles attend a tonsure ritual, which marks the end of Brahmin New Year. The removal of the hair signifies the rite of passage from childhood to adulthood.

Children with traditional hairstyles attend a tonsure ritual, which marks the end of Brahmin New Year. The removal of the hair signifies the rite of passage from childhood to adulthood.

An anxious boy tries to keep calm as his parents shave his hair off.

An anxious boy tries to keep calm as his parents shave his hair off.