Mothers of Koh Tao convicts beg for clemency

Mothers of Koh Tao convicts beg for clemency

Win Zaw Htun (left) and Zaw Lin leave the courtroom after hearing the Supreme Court uphold their death sentence on Aug 29 for the Sept 2014 murder of two British backpackers on Koh Tao. (Photo by Pattarapong Chatpattarasill)
Win Zaw Htun (left) and Zaw Lin leave the courtroom after hearing the Supreme Court uphold their death sentence on Aug 29 for the Sept 2014 murder of two British backpackers on Koh Tao. (Photo by Pattarapong Chatpattarasill)

The mothers of two Myanmar men sentenced to death for the murder of a pair of British backpackers on Koh Tao submitted a plea for clemency from His Majesty the King on Thursday, in a case tainted by claims of irregularities.

Myanmar migrant workers Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Tun were sentenced to death for the rape and murder of Hannah Witheridge, 23, and the killing of David Miller, 24. They lost all appeals.

The  victims' battered bodies were found on a beach in the diving resort island of Koh Tao in September 2014.

Defence lawyers have said the evidence used to convict the two men were unreliable as authorities had mishandled DNA and did not allow independent analysis of the samples.

They also argued that confessions by the pair were obtained under duress.

Defence appeals were exhausted in August and a royal pardon or commutation of the death sentence by the King is the last chance of a reprieve.

"We are not challenging the judgement. We are saying that... by giving them the death penalty, they will lose the opportunity to do something good with their lives," lawyer Nadthasiri Bergman said.

She joined the mothers of the two men, and Myanmar embassy officials, to submit the request at the sprawling Bangkok prison where they are being held.

"They deserve a second chance," she added.

In the request, Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Tun have pleaded for "compassion from the king," Andy Hall, adviser to the legal defence team, added.

The original rulings on the 2014 double killing divided relatives of the victims.

Miller's parents backed the court's decision, but the family of Witheridge were more cautious, with her sister saying she believed the investigation had been "bungled".

The case has triggered a strong reaction from Myanmar, where many felt the two men, as lowly paid migrant workers, had been given an unfair trial.

The police were accused of buckling under pressure to solve a crime that attracted global attention.

Zaw Lin's brother who was working alongside him in Thailand at the time of the murder said earlier this month that the two were simply used as "scapegoats" to save Thailand's image.

"Hearing the judge give him (Zaw Lin) the death sentence was horrific," Maung Zaw Win told AFP at their family home in western Rakhine State,  one of Myanmar's most impoverished.

"I ask the Thai King to show kindness to them, to show them humanity," he added.

It is unclear when the sentence will be carried out, with hundreds remaining on death row.

Last year Thailand carried out its first execution since 2009, prompting criticism by rights groups who had hoped the country was moving towards abolishing capital punishment.


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