Revenues plummet for elite schools

Revenues plummet for elite schools

Private schools are calling on the government to intervene after facing a serious lack of liquidity as the result of Covid-19. Many may have to close down.

Supaset Khanakul, president of the Association Board of Coordination and Promotion of Private Education (APPE), said private schools are running out of cash and many have laid off teachers and staff.

He said more than 20,000 teachers and staff at privately-run schools have lost their jobs during the Covid-19 pandemic as schools try to cut costs.

"The problem that most schools face is a lack of liquidity. If they can't reopen when the next term arrives, parents won't pay tuition fees.

"The government should speed up help," he said.

According to Mr Supaset, more than 1,000 private schools may have to close due to liquidity problems.

As they battle with Covid pressures, many have cut staff salaries by 10-50% to stay afloat.

"More than 20,000 private schools across the country have stopped hiring teachers and staff to maintain liquidity," he said.

Mr Supaset also urged Peerasak Rattana, newly-appointed chief of the Office of the Private Education Commission (Opec), to push through key policies including an increase in the student subsidy.

Mr Peerasak will succeed Attapol Truektrong as the Opec secretary-general when Mr Attapol retires at the end of this month.

Meanwhile, Mr Attapol said he expects Mr Peerasak to see through the database development project on private schools and their merger, which will serve as a tool to provide assistance to schools in the provinces.

He also said informal private schools such as vocational training colleges will play a vital role in the Covid-19 recovery process but they need proper financial support.

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