Suspected plane debris washes ashore

Suspected plane debris washes ashore

A suspected plane part is found in Nakhon Si Thammarat. Nucharee Rakrun
A suspected plane part is found in Nakhon Si Thammarat. Nucharee Rakrun

NAKHON SI THAMMARAT: A large piece of what looks to be aircraft debris has washed up on a beach in Pak Phanang district.

The suspected wreckage was discovered on a beach in tambon Laem Talumphuk by tambon administrative organisation (TAO) workers.

Prayut Thanawatthana, the tambon's kamnan, said the piece, which is thought to be made of aluminium and measures 1.2 metres wide and 3 metres long, was taken to his house pending an inspection by experts.

No lettering or serial numbers were found on the surface which shows four yellow stars set against a white and red background.

The piece had collected barnacles suggesting it had been floating in the sea for a long time; it also had tear marks on some of the edges.

Mr Prayut said the TAO has alerted local police and experts to examine the item telling them it appears to belong to an aircraft.

Debris from aircraft was twice previously found on beaches in Pak Phanang district -- in tambon Bang Phra in 2015 and in tambon Tha Phaya earlier this year.

Do you like the content of this article?
COMMENT (6)

Russian 'forever'

Vladimir Putin formally annexes four occupied regions in Ukraine “forever” and repeats warnings that Russia will use all available means to defend the territories.

30 Sep 2022

Activists call for major anti-Prayut rally on Saturday

Pro-democracy protest leaders have called for people to wear black for seven days and to rally at Victory Monument on Saturday to express their rejection of the Constitutional Court ruling that Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha's term has not reached its eight-year limit.

30 Sep 2022

Pheu Thai disagrees with Prayut ruling

The opposition Pheu Thai Party has expressed disagreement with the reasoning behind the Constitutional Court ruling that Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha’s tenure as prime minister did not begin until 2017.

30 Sep 2022