Senate passes royal security decree

Senate passes royal security decree

Senator Somchai Sawaengkarn criticised the Future Forward Party for voting against the executive decree on the partial transfer of army units to a royal security command unit. (Bangkok Post file photo)
Senator Somchai Sawaengkarn criticised the Future Forward Party for voting against the executive decree on the partial transfer of army units to a royal security command unit. (Bangkok Post file photo)

An executive decree on the partial transfer of army units and budget to a royal security command unit sailed through the Senate on Sunday with no resistance.

The Senate passed the executive decree by 223-0 votes after the House of Representatives on Thursday passed it by 374-70. The MPs who voted against the decree are members of the 81-strong opposition Future Forward Party (FFP).

The decree provides for the transfer of some of the manpower and budget allocation of the 1st Infantry Regiment of the Ratcha Wallop Royal Guards and the 11th Infantry Regiment of the Ratcha Wallop Royal Guards to the royal security command unit.

The FFP argued on Thursday that use of an executive decree for a "non-urgent" matter was a case of the cabinet misusing its power in violation of the constitution.

Senator Somchai Sawaengkarn took to the floor to accuse the FFP of stirring conflict in the country. He defended the urgency of the decree, saying it was a matter of national security. He called for an end to what he described as the party's "anti-royalist stance", saying it could lead to a crisis in the country.

The Senate will soon send the decree to Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, who will forward it to His Majesty the King for royal endorement.


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