Public opinion split over FFP's dissolution: Poll

Public opinion split over FFP's dissolution: Poll

Students protest against the Constitutional Court's decision that dissolved the country's second largest opposition Future Forward party, less than a year after an election to end direct military rule, at Kasetsart University in Bangkok on Saturday. (Reuters photo)
Students protest against the Constitutional Court's decision that dissolved the country's second largest opposition Future Forward party, less than a year after an election to end direct military rule, at Kasetsart University in Bangkok on Saturday. (Reuters photo)

Public opinion is split on the dissolution of the Future Forward Party (FFP) vary, with about one third saying core party members should accept the decision and a slightly larger number saying they should oppose it and find a way for the movement to continue its political activities, according to an opinion survey by the National Institute of Development Administration, or Nida Poll.

The poll was carried out on Feb 26-27 on 1,260 people aged 18 and over of various levels of education and occupations throughout the country to compile their opinions after the Constitutional Court issued a ruling to dissolve the party and ban its executives from politics for ten years -- a move that has been followed by students holding flash mobs and using an online hashtag campaign in protest. 

Asked how the former FFP core members should respond to the court's decision, 33.41% of the respondents said they should accept it; 25.32% said they should honestly express their opposition to the court's decision; 11.35% suggested that they launch a nation-wide campaign for the remaining MPs to conduct political activities on their behalf; 8.65% said the remaining MPs have the right to defect to another party; 8.33% suggested that the former core party members should end their political roles; 5.71% said the remaining MPs should move to a new party prepared beforehand as FFP's replacement; 4.29% said the former FFP core members should lead street protests; and 10.71% had no comment or were not interested.

Regarding the students' holding flash mobs and using anti-government hashtags, 61.03% said they have the right and freedom to do so under the law; 21.11% saw them as a sign of another looming political conflict; 12.70% were concerned the students would be used as political tools; 7.78% worried the gatherings would turn into riots as seen in Hong Kong; 6.35% thought the students' activities would soon fade away; and 2.46% had no comment or were not interested.

Asked whether a replacement party with support from the former FFP core members would be the same as the old party in term of popularity, 35.71% believed it would be more popular; 24.37% were uncertain, saying this would depend on future developments; 22.78% believed it would be as popular as the old party; 15.08% said it would be less popular; and 2.06% had no comment or were not interested.


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