Charter to declare orbital satellite slots national assets

Charter to declare orbital satellite slots national assets

The Constitution Drafting Committee to define Thailand's orbital slots as national assets in the new draft constitution. (Photo by Pattarapong Chatpattarasill)
The Constitution Drafting Committee to define Thailand's orbital slots as national assets in the new draft constitution. (Photo by Pattarapong Chatpattarasill)

Orbital slots for satellites and broadcasting spectrum will be protected as state assets to be used in the best interests of the people in the new draft constitution.

This was revealed on Wednesday by Constitution Drafting Committee (CDC) spokesman Chartchai Na Chiangmai.

He said a section in the draft charter defined any orbital slot or spectrum assigned to Thailand as a national asset, and their use must serve the utmost public interest and national security.

The definition was aimed at preventing any operator from using an orbital slot or assigned spectrum to take advantage of the public, such as the collection of unreasonably high service fees or blocking people's access to accurate information, Mr Chartchai said.

CDC chairman Meechai Ruchupan said it would be clearly stated that orbital slots reserved for Thai satellites, both government and private sector, were national assets, like radio frequencies.

An operator could not occupy an orbital slot as its own asset, but it could use it under a concession and pay a concession fee to the state, he said.

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