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The Golden Teak Museum

Address:90, Sri Ayuttaya Rd., Wachiraphayaban, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 Thailand

Tel:+662-628-9880, +662-628-7956

Service day:Everyday, Service hours: 10:00-17:00

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Official description

Nestled in the compound of Wat Devaraj Kunchorn Voraviharn in Dusit district, the Golden Teak Museum stands tall and graceful upon 59 big teak pillars that date back almost 500 years.

Once named Ban Kaew in Phrae province, the teak house was later relocated to Pathum Thani and donated to the temple by former senate speaker Ukrit Mongkolnavin, before being transformed intoa museum for scientific and Buddhist learning and moral teaching.

Stepping inside the museum, visitors will immediately be greeted with an exhibition: From Ban Kaew to the Golden Teak Museum. A wooden chopping block is on display, which has a corresponding commentary on significant events alongside the growth rings of the teak.

On the second floor of the Golden Teak Museum is a standing Buddha image, in the posture of stopping seawater, dating to the Ayutthaya period as well as a number of Buddha images and old objects presented by some members of the royal family to the temple. On the left side is a room containing the Lord Buddha’s relics and a Buddha statue. The relics are surrounded by life-size fibreglass figures of a number of highly revered Thai monks, including Luang Pu Thuad, known for changing seawater to freshwater by stepping on it. Biographies of the Rattanakosin era’s 19 supreme patriarchs are also in this room.

The Golden Teak Museum is open daily during 10am-5pm. Admission fee is 30 baht per head. For more information, visit www.goldenteakmuseum.com or call 02-628-7956 or 02-628-9880.

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Editorial Reviews

A museum at a Bangkok temple lauds the importance of teak trees and tells the history of Buddhism in Thailand

Eighteen life-size fibreglass figures of several highly revered Thai monks.

Nestled in the compound of Wat Devaraj Kunchorn Voraviharn in Dusit district, the Golden Teak Museum stands tall and graceful upon 59 big teak pillars that date back almost 500 years.

Once named Ban Kaew in Phrae province, the teak house was later relocated to Pathum Thani and donated to the temple by former senate speaker Ukrit Mongkolnavin, before being transformed intoa museum for scientific and Buddhist learning and moral teaching.

Stepping inside the museum, visitors will immediately be greeted with an exhibition: From Ban Kaew to the Golden Teak Museum. A wooden chopping block is on display, which has a corresponding commentary on significant events alongside the growth rings of the teak.

The Research and Training Center of Tree Ring and Climate Change, Mahidol University, conducted a study to determine the age of the museum’s teak wood based on the tree rings. The study included samples from 15 of the 59 teak pillars that form the structure of the museum and through analysing the growth rings and radiocarbon dating, the centre concluded that the teak wood used for the construction is around 479 years old.

On the second floor of the Golden Teak Museum is a standing Buddha image, in the posture of stopping seawater, dating to the Ayutthaya period as well as a number of Buddha images and old objects presented by some members of the royal family to the temple. On the left side is a room containing the Lord Buddha’s relics and a Buddha statue. The relics are surrounded by life-size fibreglass figures of a number of highly revered Thai monks, including Luang Pu Thuad, known for changing seawater to freshwater by stepping on it. Biographies of the Rattanakosin era’s 19 supreme patriarchs are also in this room.

Walking across the central hall to a room on the right side, visitors will see the life-size fibreglass figures of 18 supreme patriarchs from the Rattanakosin period. The model of Supreme Patriarch Somdej Phra Yanasangvorn Sakolmaha Sangha Parinayok (Charoen Suvatthano) who passed away last year is yet to be built as the museum is raising funds for the project. Adjacent to this room is the HM King Chulalongkorn Room, which houses a statue and large photo of the monarch wearing the uniform of the Royal Thai Navy’s fleet admiral.

The Golden Teak Museum.

Walking down the stairs and turning left from the main hall is the room that contains an exhibition on Buddhism and the Devaraj Kunchorn Temple. This is the place to find out about the history of Buddhism in Thailand and the history and restoration of the temple and its major architectural structures. Wat Devaraj Kunchorn was built during the Ayutthaya period and was initially called Wat Samor Khraeng, or Thamor Khraeng. In the reign of King Rama IV, the temple was renamed Wat Devaraj Kunchorn after Prince Phitakdeves, a son of King Rama II and the founder of the Kunchorn family, who restored the temple.It was later registered by the Fine Arts Department as a historical site.

Its ordination hall (ubosot) houses the revered Buddha statue Phra Phutthadevaraj Patimakorn in the posture of subduing Mara. This 5.65m-tall statue was made of metal during the Dvaravati period (6th-11th centuries) and covered with gold lacquer.

In less than an hour in the Golden Teak Museum, visitors can learn so much more about teak trees and their growth rings as well as Buddhism in Thailand and Thai morals.


The Golden Teak Museum is open daily during 10am-5pm. Admission fee is 30 baht per head. For more information, visit www.goldenteakmuseum.com or call 02-628-7956 or 02-628-9880.

Location

90, Sri Ayuttaya Rd., Wachiraphayaban, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 Thailand

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