Annual match debuts digital card stunt

Annual match debuts digital card stunt

Sarath Ratanavadi (centre), chief executive of Gulf Energy Development Plc, proudly supports the CU–TU Unity Football Match 2024 as part of his commitment to nurturing the creative potential and abilities of the younger generation. The match took place at Suphachalasai Stadium yesterday.
Sarath Ratanavadi (centre), chief executive of Gulf Energy Development Plc, proudly supports the CU–TU Unity Football Match 2024 as part of his commitment to nurturing the creative potential and abilities of the younger generation. The match took place at Suphachalasai Stadium yesterday.

Yesterday's CU–TU Unity Football Match 2024 used digital light-emitting diode display technology for a card stunt for the first time, promoting sustainability while tapping into social media for marketing.

A card stunt is a planned, coordinated sequence of actions performed by an audience, whose members raise cards that create a recognisable image.

The traditional football match between Thammasat and Chulalongkorn universities was cancelled for four years because of the pandemic.

Students from both schools decided to jointly organise the event titled "The CU–TU Unity Football Match 2024".

This year marks the 75th year of the traditional rivalry.

The event took place at Suphachalasai Stadium, part of the National Stadium sports complex.

The stunt added a new dimension to the event, while staying true to its value of being a platform to "voice" for important social issues, according to the schools.

Piyawit Wangchootham, co-president (Thammasat University) of the match, told the Bangkok Post the event was supported by senior alumni and sponsors, including Chulalongkorn University alum Sarath Ratanavadi, chief executive of Gulf Energy Development.

The event gained support from partners such as Advanced Info Service, which broadcast the event on its AIS Play streaming app.

AIS also provided a network signal for the digital tech display used for the card stunt.

Mr Piyawit said the advice and support of alumni, mentors and partners enabled the successful management of the event, which involved 2,000 individuals.

"We did our best in a short period of time to maintain our legacy spirit, bringing unity and participation so we could share the moment together," he said.

Given the long delay in organising the annual event, with only three months to prepare compared with six months under normal conditions, there were no cheerleaders and not much time to prepare a conventional stunt card performance, said Mr Piyawit.

Poonyapha Kunawidcha, co-president of the match, said this was the first time the event used digital display technology for a stunt card performance.

The event used digital displays measuring one metre by one metre, arranging them in the grandstand instead of using regular cards.

Mr Piyawit said there is not a plan to permanently replace regular card stunt plates with digital ones, though the event might use both forms over the coming years.

The event has a Line account that allows the crowd to share pictures from the stadium.

Staff can select the best pictures and display them live in the stadium, said Ms Poonyapha.

The event also reflected other modern trends.

For example, the parade used electric vehicles for the first time and embraced sustainability by using recycled materials as much as possible during the event, said the organisers.

The event also used a "fandom" marketing approach by urging alumni and students who are key opinion leaders and influencers to promote the football match on their social media platforms.

Opinion leaders and influencers also participated in the parade.

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