Piaget says give us the night
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Piaget says give us the night

New Solstice collection celebrates the setting Sun

SOCIAL & LIFESTYLE
Piaget says give us the night
Detaching the Lady Pink Ring allows wearing a solitaire.

Although not a jeweller from its very beginning in 1874, Piaget is as dedicated to haute joaillerie as haute horlogerie.

The jewellery collection premiered in 1959 at the first Salon Piaget in Geneva, which later became home to its goldsmithing and gemsetting "Ateliers de l'Extraordinaire".

To show as much expertise as possible, Piaget's high jewellery collection is divided into chapters and follows an immersive narrative.

The first chapter of the new Solstice collection is set against a setting Sun when the pretty Piaget protagonist has to pick an outfit to celebrate the year's longest night.

This chapter opens with the white gold Flamboyant Nightfall set of transformable necklace and ring as well as matching earrings, graced with sapphires from Sri Lanka and Madagascar.

Haute couture-inspired sets include Voluptuous Ribbon with pink sapphires and Generous Laces with diamonds. The fluid designs replicate the asymmetry of fabric ribbon.

Centred by a Zambian emerald, the articulated Precious Adornment necklace evokes the movement and adaptability of an evening gown.

Transformable white gold Shimmering Savor necklace and earrings.

Another nod to the twirling of a sumptuous dress, the dial of the Dazzling Swirl watch is paved with baguette- and brilliant-cut diamonds thanks to gemsetting mastery while the flying tourbillon movement shows the maison's prowess in complications.

Solstice's second instalment themed "Give Us The Night" calls for a party along with laughter and long conversations under the shimmering Moon.

The Swiss luxury brand turns to cocktails for inspiration and looked for gemstones to represent ingredients such as grenadine (pink sapphires), mint leaves (emeralds), sprinkled sugar (diamonds paved mounting), ice cubes (rough diamonds), or slices of lime (sculpted peridot).

The volume, colours and textures of the cocktails' ingredients have been reproduced by its craftsmen to look as realistic as possible.

The fruit slices were hand-sculpted by glyptic masters, and precision was highly required for the diamonds and metal slice covering the fruit to fit perfectly.

Piaget's high-jewellery is crafted at 'Ateliers de l'Extraordinaire' in the outskirts of Geneva.

The playful cocktail rings, such as Royal Blue, Lady Pink and Lemon Fizz, can be detached and one part can be worn as a solitaire with a central gem, such as indicolite tourmaline, rubellite and yellow sapphire.

White gold Shimmering Savor is another transformable piece, comprising two necklaces, one with a pendant set with a pear-shaped diamond.

Recalling warm and rich colours of a dark-brown liquor, the rose gold Audacious Savor necklace sparkles with exceptional natural brown diamonds, sugarloaf spessartites and brilliant-cut diamonds.

The square-shaped gold structures set with diamonds recall the shape of the ice cubes in a glass, representing how Piaget likes to drink on the rocks.

Fresh Surprise Earcuff set with sapphires, spessartites, spinels, citrine and diamonds.

Piaget's high-jewellery is crafted at 'Ateliers de l'Extraordinaire' in the outskirts of Geneva.

Exceptional natural brown diamonds, spessartites and diamonds sparkle on Audacious Savor necklace.

Audacious Savor earrings set with spessartites and diamonds.

The Royal Blue ring is centred by an indicolite tourmaline.

Bay Breeze earrings set with pink sapphires, emeralds and sapphires.

Transformable Flamboyant Nightfall necklace and ring, centred by a sapphire respectively from Sri Lanka and Madagascar.

Transformable Flamboyant Nightfall necklace and ring, centred by a sapphire respectively from Sri Lanka and Madagascar

Voluptuous Ribbon necklace centred by a pink sapphire from Madagascar.

Detaching the Lady Pink Ring allows wearing a solitaire.

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