Action sought against Koreans cooking giant clams

Action sought against Koreans cooking giant clams

Park officials show the pictures copied from social media showing a diver catching a giant clam in Hat Chao Mai national park in Kantang district in Trang. (Photo by Methee Muangkaew)
Park officials show the pictures copied from social media showing a diver catching a giant clam in Hat Chao Mai national park in Kantang district in Trang. (Photo by Methee Muangkaew)

TRANG: Park officials on Thursday asked police to take action against the crew of a South Korean broadcaster who used giant clams caught in Thailand in one of its dishes.

Narong Kong-ead, chief of Hat Chao Mai National Park, and Amnart Yanglang, the Koh Kradan supervisor, filed the complaint with Kantang police against the crew of SBS Broadcasting Center after pictures on social media showing them catching the clams and use them in one of the dishes.

Giant clams are protected as endangered species. Catchers could be fined up to 20,000 baht and/or jailed for no more than five years.

The officials said the catch took place on the Andaman Sea off Loh Udang bay, part of the park, on Sunday. It was filmed for the Law of the Jungle TV show of SBS, with The Sixth Element Co of Thailand as a coordinator.

The Thai firm has asked permission from the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation to film the TV programme at Hat Chao Mai.


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