Covid in Malaysia drives thousands of Thais home

Covid in Malaysia drives thousands of Thais home

People wearing protective masks wait to cross a street in Kuala Lumpur amid the coronavirus disease outbreak in Malaysia on Jan 29, 2021. (Reuters photo)
People wearing protective masks wait to cross a street in Kuala Lumpur amid the coronavirus disease outbreak in Malaysia on Jan 29, 2021. (Reuters photo)

About 19,000 Thai workers in Malaysia have returned home due to the economic impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic and the Malaysian ringgit, while 30,000 others have stayed on, according to Mongkol Sinsomboon, the Thai Consul-General to Kota Bharu.

Figures show 38,487 Thai workers work legally in Malaysia with 30,000 others working illegally in the neighbouring country, said Mr Mongkol.

The two groups of Thai migrant workers have sent home about 400 million baht a month, he said.

But the new wave of Covid-19 early this year, which also hit Malaysia hard, prompted the Malaysian government to invoke a state of emergency and left many Thai workers without jobs, he said.

Before the pandemic struck last year, Malaysia's policy on migrant labour was appealing to Thai workers, he said.

The Malaysian government began requiring employers to take out social security coverage for migrant workers.

From Jan 1 last year, it raised the minimum wage to 1,200 ringgit (8,995 baht) per month, from 1,100 ringgit per month previously, in 57 cities, he said.

The new minimum wage applied to all types of work except for domestic helpers, he said.

In April 30, 2019 the work permit levy for migrant workers was lowered, he added.

The work permit levy imposed on each migrant worker in the service, construction, manufacturing and mining sectors, for instance, was lowered from 10,000 ringgit to 6,000 ringgit.

The levy imposed on workers in the plantation and agriculture sections was lowered from 3,500 ringgit to 2,000 ringgit.

The Malaysian government also allowed a higher ratio of migrant workers to local workers, he said.

However, the Covid-19 pandemic forced the government to lock down the country.

It also came as the Malaysian government was struggling to cope with its public debt problem, resulting in a steep fall in the value of the ringgit, he said.

As a result, many Thai workers decided not to renew their work contracts while some had even requested to have work contracts terminated before they actually expired, he said.

According to Malaysia's labour figures, Malaysia was hiring 125,795 Myanmar nationals, 117,733 Indian nationals, 568,929 Bangladeshi nationals, 316,102 Nepali nationals, 704,175 Indonesian nationals and 38,487 Thai nationals before the pandemic.

Do you like the content of this article?
COMMENT (7)

UK media return fire at ‘Harry the Nasty’

LONDON: Britain’s media, the main focus of criticism so far in Netflix docuseries “Harry and Meghan”, on Friday hit back at the estranged prince and his wife, accusing them of lying and insulting Queen Elizabeth II.

17:31

Pet food maker I-Tail dips on SET debut

Shares of I-Tail Corp Plc, the country’s biggest pet food maker, closed below their initial public offering (IPO) price on their first trading day on the Stock Exchange of Thailand after the second-biggest IPO of the year.

17:01

Mercedes-Benz to make EVs in Thailand

Mercedes-Benz Group has committed to manufacturing electric vehicles in Thailand after signing an agreement to import its battery-powered cars as part of a government plan to bolster the country’s status as a clean automaking hub.

16:51