Most think 'work from home' can help contain Covid: poll

Most think 'work from home' can help contain Covid: poll

Empty roads in Bangkok show that many people are working at home rather than commuting to their offices. (Photo by Nutthawat Wicheanbut)
Empty roads in Bangkok show that many people are working at home rather than commuting to their offices. (Photo by Nutthawat Wicheanbut)

A majority of people think the government's "work from home" policy for employees in both the public and private sectors can help reduce the risk of contracting Covid-19, a survey by Suan Dusit Rajabhat University (Suan Dusit Poll) reveals.

The poll was conducted online on May 10-13 on 1,553 people throughout the country to compile their opinion on the "work from home" policy.

The survey found that during the Covid-19 pandemic 42.72% of the respondents worked from home; 34.45% worked both from home and in their office; and 22.83% did not work from home at all.

Asked about their attitudes towards "work from home", with each respondent allowed to select more than one answer, 74.82% said they felt safe and thought it could help reduce the spread of Covid-19; 48.60% thought it was a way of cooperating with the government; 44.05% said it allowed them to have more time for themselves and their families; 40.53% said they did not have the necessary equipment to work from home; and 39.04% said they missed the office atmosphere.

The respondents were then asked about the "favourable" and "unfavourable" aspects of "work from home".

Concerning the "favourable" points, 88.33% said it would help contain the spread of the novel coronavirus; 70.19% said it helped reduce travel costs; and 60.73% said it was a way of giving the government a helping hand.

On the "unfavourable" points, 65.80% said they had to pay more for electricity, water and the internet; 62.08% cited insufficient work equipment; and 45.97% mentioned slow communication and responses.

Asked to compare between "work from home" and "work in the office", 37.17% said they liked both equally; 36.13% preferred to work in the office; 18.10% preferred to work from home; and 8.60% had no comment.

Asked whether they thought "work from home" could really help constrain the Covid-19 pandemic, 82.66% said "yes"; 13.14% were uncertain; and 4.20% said "no".

The average success rating of the "work from home" policy evaluated by the respondents was 70.33%.

Do you like the content of this article?
COMMENT (23)

Asian markets track Wall St rally as Fed taper concerns ease

Most Asian markets rebounded Tuesday from the previous day's sell-off as concerns about the pace of expected US Federal Reserve monetary tightening eased, while oil prices pushed to new two-year highs above $75 on demand optimism.

10:50

May exports likely surged more than 40% y/y - Jurin

Thailand's exports likely surged more than 40% in May from a year earlier, Commerce Minister Jurin Laksanawisit said on Tuesday.

10:35

Duterte threatens to jail those who refuse Covid vaccines

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened to jail those who refuse Covid-19 vaccines as the nation ramps up inoculations to prevent the spread of the highly contagious delta variant.

10:20