Baby crocs hatch in Nakhon Sawan lake

Baby crocs hatch in Nakhon Sawan lake

A newborn Siamese crocodile swims in Bueng Boraphet in Nakhon Sawan. (Photo: Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife and Plant Conservation)
A newborn Siamese crocodile swims in Bueng Boraphet in Nakhon Sawan. (Photo: Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife and Plant Conservation)

Newborn Siamese crocodiles have been found in Nakhon Sawan's Bueng Boraphet, the country's largest freshwater lake, for the first time in seven years due to its rich ecosystem and residents' cooperation in preserving the environment.

The latest discovery adds to the growing population of Siamese crocodiles in a lake that was once teeming with the reptile.

The Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) director-general, Athapol Charoenshunsa, said on Wednesday that at least 35 Siamese crocodiles have been seen in Bueng Boraphet so far.

He said the crocodiles are split into two groups. The first group of 20-25 live near the entrance to a water passage; the second group, including eight newborns, live in Bueng Boraphet's non-hunting area.

According to records in the Bueng Boraphet non-hunting area, this is the first time in over seven years that newborn crocodiles had hatched from their eggs in the region.

The birth of the baby crocs is attributed to a healthy ecosystem in the lake, the improved weather and temperature, locals' cooperation with authorities in avoiding invasions into the crocodiles' habitat, and authorities acting to prevent any threats posed by tourists, said Mr Athapol.

The non-hunting area accounts for 66,250 rai of Bueng Boraphet's total area of 132,737 rai.

Its rich natural resources allow for diverse species of plants and animals to grow and thrive, according to the authorities.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites) says Siamese crocodiles face a high risk of extinction.

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