Yingluck denies Thaksin's involvement

Yingluck denies Thaksin's involvement

Former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra is greeted by supporters as she arrived at the Supreme Court's Criminal Division for Persons Holding Politician Positions for the seventh hearing of prosecution witnesses in the rice-pledging programme case on Friday. (Photo by Pattanapong Hirunard)
Former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra is greeted by supporters as she arrived at the Supreme Court's Criminal Division for Persons Holding Politician Positions for the seventh hearing of prosecution witnesses in the rice-pledging programme case on Friday. (Photo by Pattanapong Hirunard)

Former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra has denied her brother has hired lobbyists and is behind recent campaigns to reject the draft constitution at the Aug 7 referendum.

Ms Yingluck came to the the Supreme Court's Criminal Division for Persons Holding Political Positions on Friday for the seventh hearing of prosecution witnesses in the rice-pledging case in which she was charged with neglect of duty.

She was greeted by supporters and former Pheu Thai MPs amid tight security provided by some 100 policemen.

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha said on Thursday former PM Thaksin Shinawatra and lobbyists overseas were behind the recent activities aimed at persuading people to cast a "no" vote on the draft charter.

He was referring to protests by the Resistant Citizen group and former Pheu Thai MP Watana Muangsook.

Thaksin's legal counsellor Noppadon Pattama denied the allegation on the same day, saying Thaksin did not hire lobbyists or was behind criticisms of foreign governments or international organisations against the junta

Ms Yingluck on Friday confirmed Mr Noppadon's account.

"I believe every country considers all facts and listens to all sides before making a decision. It won't let its decisions be dictated by lobbyists. Life is hard enough for him [Thaksin] abroad and he's unlikely to plot such things."

On the referendum on the constitution, she said it was natural that people had different opinions. "I'd like the NCPO to realise having differences of opinions is not divisions. People agree and disagree [with the charter]. If we allow all to speak freely, voters can hear reasons from all sides and that will be more beneficial," she said.

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