Olympic mascot cakes land Chinese bakers in trouble

Olympic mascot cakes land Chinese bakers in trouble

Bing Dwen Dwen, one of the Games' two official mascots
Bing Dwen Dwen, one of the Games' two official mascots

BEIJING - Chinese bakers looking to cash in on the popularity of the Beijing Winter Olympics mascot have ended up on thin ice after market authorities cracked down on sweet treats shaped like the cartoon panda.

Officials cited licensing concerns for their swoops on the gastronomic homages to Bing Dwen Dwen.

Generally depicted in a full-body ice suit, Bing Dwen Dwen has sparked long queues at Olympic souvenir shops -- with many willing to fork out more than the official price to get their hands on one amid shortages.

While its name officially means "ice child" in Mandarin, this is more colloquially translated as "ice chubster". It is often seen alongside Shuey Rhon Rhon, mascot for the Winter Paralympic Games.

Authorities have said they are investigating several businesses using the Olympics symbol without permission.

One bakery in the southeastern province of Jiangsu was reported for advertising cakes shaped like the rotund panda, and lacked "relevant authorisation", local officials said Friday.

"A six-inch cake in the shape of Bing Dwen Dwen was found at the scene... the parties made three such cakes, worth 600 yuan ($94)," said the market supervision administration in Nantong city.

State media said authorities had received a "tip-off" about the alleged crime.

A dessert store in the eastern Shantou city was also stopped from selling sweet treats shaped like the mascot and bearing the Olympic rings, another official notice said.

"Intellectual property rights such as patents and copyrights of Bing Dwen Dwen are owned by the Beijing Winter Olympics Organising Committee," the notice stressed.

Offending bakeries were also reported in other parts of the country, said state media.

With the Lunar New Year coinciding with the start of the Olympics and affecting production of toys in the shape of the mascot, a supply shortage in recent weeks has seen scalpers selling the product for 10 times its original price of 200 yuan ($30), according to reports.

Spectators are largely banned from the Games due to Covid-19 restrictions, and owning the mascot may be the closest most people get to the Beijing Winter Olympics.

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