CDC slams 'seven reasons to vote no'
text size

CDC slams 'seven reasons to vote no'

Prayut vows to write new charter if need be

Four student activists opposing the draft constitution, along with a reporter for Prachatai website, were handcuffed and taken to the Ratchaburi Provincial Court on charges of violating the Referendum Law. They were freed on bail despite police protests that they needed 12 days to interrogate the five in detention. (Photo by Saichol Srinuanchan)
Four student activists opposing the draft constitution, along with a reporter for Prachatai website, were handcuffed and taken to the Ratchaburi Provincial Court on charges of violating the Referendum Law. They were freed on bail despite police protests that they needed 12 days to interrogate the five in detention. (Photo by Saichol Srinuanchan)

The seven reasons outlined by the New Democracy Movement (NDM) as a basis for voting No in the upcoming charter referendum are intended to distort the draft charter, the Constitution Drafting Committee's (CDC) sub-panel has found.

CDC spokesman Udom Rathamarit said Monday the sub-panel was assigned to study the document produced by the NDM, which outlines seven reasons why the movement will reject the draft charter in the referendum.

The sub-panel found the reasons were peppered with intent to distort the content of the draft charter, mislead readers and spur incitement.

The NDM opposes several key proposals in the draft, such as an appointed Senate and a non-MP prime minister; and alleges the military will attempt to extend its hold on power.

The CDC has three options: To file legal action against the NDM; ask the Election Commission to do it; or pursue no action and work harder to explain the draft charter's content to the people, according to Mr Udom.

CDC members will decide what action to take once they have finished debating the options.

Mr Udom said people are free to express their views on the draft charter. However, they must take care to ensure their views do not mislead people.

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha expressed concerns Monday over attempts to distort the draft charter.

Gen Prayut said some taxi drivers have been spreading false rumours that when the new government is formed, the 30-baht universal healthcare scheme and 15-year free education system would be abolished.

Responding to concerns the charter could be shot down in the referendum, the prime minister said: "If things do not go well, I can write the new one. I will write what people want."

National Legislative Assembly (NLA) member Somjet Boonthanom said a video clip produced by the NLA to address the question of whether the voter agrees with a proposal allowing an appointed Senate to help the House of Representatives select a prime minister in the referendum will be revised.

This is to prevent it being seen as influencing voters, which is against the referendum law.

Meanwhile, the National Broadcasting Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) reaffirmed the suspension of Peace TV's operating licence for 30 days starting Monday.

Pakdee Manaves, the NBTC deputy secretary-general, said the broadcasting committee agreed to send a letter to the court explaining the differences between this case and the one filed last year.

He said the letter would ask the Central Administrative Court to reconsider the differences pertaining to Peace TV's suspension for violating orders of the National Council for Peace and Order, or Section 37 of the Broadcasting Act.

He said that despite the court issuing a temporary injunction against the NBCT's closure order on July 16 of last year allowing Peace TV to continue broadcasting, this move was a different action brought about due to violations of Section 37 of the Broadcasting Act.

The TV programmes which violated the order were Khao Jai Trong Khan Na (Having the Same Understanding) broadcast on March 11 and 21,Khem Khao Duek (Late Night News) from March 24, and Hong Khao Lao Rueng (Newsroom Talking) on March 28.

Last week, the regulator decided to suspend Peace TV's operating licence for 30 days effective July 11.

Do you like the content of this article?
COMMENT