Second net to catch floating dead Khao Yai elephants

Second net to catch floating dead Khao Yai elephants

Park officials install another big net downstream from Haew Narok Waterfall on Tuesday to catch the floating carcasses of the wild elephants. (Photo from National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department Facebook page)
Park officials install another big net downstream from Haew Narok Waterfall on Tuesday to catch the floating carcasses of the wild elephants. (Photo from National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department Facebook page)

Another large net has been set to catch the carcasses of more dead wild elephants floating downstream from Haew Narok waterfall, as efforts continue to prevent them polluting the the reservoir of the Khun Dan Prakan Chon dam.

Park officials assisted by volunteers completed stringing the second net at Klong Ton Sai as the National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation said in a Facebook message that the first of the rotting carcasses of the elephants that fell from Haew Narok waterfall in Khao Yai National Park were expected to reach the blockade sooner than expected because of the strong current.

The second net was installed  after five more dead elephants were discovered at the same location where the first six animals were spotted and netted on Saturday. The nets are used to prevent the carcasses floating downstream into the reservoir of the dam in Nakhon Nayok. The water from the waterfall flows into Ton Sai canal and then to the dam reservoir.

Wichai Pornleesaengsuwan, director of the Protected Areas Office based in Prachin Buri, said on Wednesday park officials and volunteers were moving upstream along the banks towards the area where the dead elephants have been found, looking for any other carcasses. He said the trail was difficult to traverse, adding to the problems of the operation.

Another group of rescuers was moving upstream in boats, pulling against the strong current.

The waterfall is one of the most popular attractions in Khao Yai. The drop in some areas from the path along the waterfall is up to 80 metres. A  small herd of wild elephants is believed to have fallen from the path.

Mr Wichai said a drone flown by the Disaster Response Associations Thailand, a non-profit organisation, has been dropping slaked lime onto the carcasses of the latest two elephants found, to prevent the spread of disease from the rotting flesh.



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